Joyce Crommett, Westborough MA Real Estate, Southborough MA Real Estate, Northborough MA Real Estate


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Of course, you want to stay within your budget when buying a house. You certainly want value for your dollar. But a buyer should never lose sight of the fact what they truly desire is getting the home they want and that fits their needs. To that end, potential buyers may put in a “low-ball” offer on a house they truly want. They may risk losing a home that meets all of their qualifications by placing an offer that is five or ten thousand dollars less than a price the seller is willing to accept. What can be even more frustrating is that even if a buyer's offer is accepted by a seller, the buyer may just waste that money, or more, on the mortgage they acquire.

Buyers may be surprised to learn how much even a half of one-percent difference in a mortgage rate can make.

Example One

In our first example, after a down payment, a buyer gets a mortgage for $250,000 over 30 years at 4.5% interest. The monthly payment would be about $1,267 monthly. Over the course of 30 years, those payments would total $456,120. The net cost of the loan is $206,120.

Example Two

In our second example, we take that same $250,000 mortgage over 30 years, but the buyer compared mortgage rates and was able to find a lender offering that same loan at 4.0% interest, one-half of one-percent less. The monthly payment would now be $1,194, totaling $429,840. The net cost of this loan is $179,840. The difference between the two loans is $26,280. All because of a .5% interest rate difference. 

The Best Way to Save Money on a Home

Rather than chancing to lose a home you really like by making an offer that is too low, consider instead performing due diligence on mortgage rates. Seeking out a lower rate can be critical in saving you five, ten or twenty thousand dollars or more. That's a far better solution than losing a home you really wanted.

There are a lot of factors that go into determining loan rates for mortgages. These include the buyer's credit rating, work history, income to debt ratio and loan to value ratio. The bottom line is the better your credit the more options you will have in securing a mortgage loan.

One of the best ways to save money on buying a home is saving money on your mortgage rates. The best way to do that is by monitoring your credit rating and working to build it. When it comes time to buy a home, get pre-qualified and compare mortgage rates. You can even use an online calculator to compare rates on your own. Need further assistance in determining how to find the right mortgage for you? Feel free to reach out, and we can embark on your mortgage and home journey together.


If you are looking to get a new loan, especially for a mortgage, a bank or your lending institution will review and approve or decline your application based on the information you provide.

That said, there is certain information that prospective lenders consider carefully when they examine your application for a home loan. This article is all about that data and the steps you can take to support your loan application as well as realize your dream of owning a house.

Here is the critical information your lender looks out for when reviewing your loan application.

1. Your Credit Score 

The number one place your lender will set their eyes on is your credit score no matter the channel you are coming from, either in person or online. This is a general rule of the thumb: if your credit score is high, you stand a better chance. Alternatively, if you have a low credit score, you will need to crack some hard nuts. So, you should give a critical look into your credit before taking the first step.

However, your credit score is just the first step. It could disqualify you immediately, but only a few banks will approve a new loan with a good credit score alone. If your bank disqualifies you based on your low credit score, do not panic as there are many other avenues to loan approval.

2. Your Payment History

If you pass step 1, now the real analysis begins. The first step after checking the credit score is to look at your complete credit history. Many banks have a system for underwriting loans using old school paper printouts. They would print your credit report for the loan file and would manually check it with a highlighter. They would select any late payments and mark them up to look for a pattern.

So, 90-day late payments are massive issues, although 30- or 60-day late payments may be pardonable. A pattern of late payments is enough to disqualify a loan application, even if you meet credit score requirements.

3. Your Ability to Repay Past Loans

When you pass steps 1 and 2, the banks will eventually shift their focus to your outstanding debt, income, and ability to repay the loan. By reviewing your complete credit report, they can determine if you have been responsible for past loans and possess the habits of making on-time payments. 

Final Thought

There are many erroneous beliefs out there about how mortgage loans are approved. You need to show both that you have the income to support the loan and a history of responsible and on-time payments. Lacking one or the other can stop your mortgage application right in its tracks.


With so much to think about these days, it is not surprising that some first-time home buyers make mistakes they later regret as they shop for a home for sale. Presented here are some of the most popular mistakes, along with tips to help you avoid a similar fate.

Looking for a home before getting a mortgage

Many first-time buyers make the mistake of seeing houses first before ever scheduling an appointment with a lending institution. In some big markets, housing inventory is still tight, and competition is so frightening. You might discover that you are eager to spend more to buy a property, or lose a property because you are not even pre-approved for a mortgage.

What is the solution to this? 

Before you fall in love with that perfect dream house you have been looking at all this while, ensure you get a complete underwritten pre-approval letter. Being pre-approved sends the signal that you are a serious buyer whose credit and finances are ready to get a loan successfully.

Buying a house that your financial muscle cannot carry

It’s easy to fall in love with houses that might make you spend more, but over-stretching yourself can cause you regrets later. It could even put you at higher risk of losing your home if you fall on the unpleasant hammer of hard financial times.

Any remedy? 

The best way to overcome this issue is to concentrate on the monthly expenses you can genuinely afford instead of looking at the highest loan amount you qualify for. Just because you are eligible for a $250,000 loan, that doesn’t mean you can afford the monthly payments that come with it. Factor in your other financial obligations that do not show on a credit report along with additional home expenses like insurance and taxes when deciding on how much house you can afford.

Emptying your savings just to buy a house

One of the biggest mistakes you can make is spending every dime you have. When you invest all your cash, including your savings on the down payment and closing costs, you set yourself up for disappointment. It will do you no good.

Some people make the mistake of spending all they have saved to make the required 20% down payment, so they don’t have to pay for mortgage insurance. However, they are making a grave mistake as they are left with no savings at all.

Homebuyers who pay 20 percent or more down do not have to pay for mortgage insurance when getting a conventional mortgage. That often translates into significant savings on the monthly mortgage payment. However, it is not worth the risk of living on the edge.

Here comes the solution.Let your aim be to save three to six months of living expenses in an emergency fund. Paying mortgage insurance is not the best, but killing your emergency or retirement savings just to make a sizeable down payment is even more of risk.

Talk to your real estate agent about their mortgage and lender recommendations and get yourself pre-approved for a realistic mortgage before starting your home search.


When you’re shopping for a home, there’s so much to consider. Between the questions of what neighborhood you should live in and what style house you like, you need to think of the most important thing: finances. When you think that you’re financially ready to buy a home, you often will get the notion that it’s a good time to just start shopping. There’s several steps that you must take first before you start shopping for a home. One of the first steps you should consider taking before you make the leap into home ownership is to get preapproved. While buyers still tend to skip the preapproval process, doing this can help you immensely throughout the home buying process. While it may seem an insignificant and kind of boring step, getting preapproved is important for your finances. It may even help you to land in a home that you love faster. It’s actually detrimental to make an offer without a preapproval, because some lenders won’t accept an offer without one. Many realtors verify and require that offers come along with the stamp of preapproval. What Does Getting Preapproved Involve? You may have heard of a prequalification. This is much different from being preapproved. Prequalification involves buyer provided information, just to get a sense of how much they can spend on a home. Preapproval involves credit scores, bank statements, tax returns and more. This process states exactly how much lenders will be willing to give to the borrower. All of the documents needed for preapproval are the same exact documents needed for a mortgage. This helps you as the borrower prepare ahead of time as well. These are some of the kinds of documents that you’ll need for preapproval: Pay stubs W-2s from the previous year Federal tax returns from the past two years Two Months of Bank Statements from all of your accounts A credit report While a preapproval is only one step in the long process of buying a home, it speeds up the later steps of securing a mortgage. The process also helps buyers face their financial reality. Don’t put off the important process because you fear that you won’t be approved for the amount that you need. It’s also common for buyers to assume that because someone they know has been approved for a certain amount of money that they will be able to get that same loan amount as well. This isn’t always the case and another great reason to get preapproved. Errors On Credit Reports Often, there are errors on credit reports. That’s why you need to check them often. If you have some errors on your credit report, getting preapproved is a great way to check if there are any errors and give you time to fix them before you apply for a mortgage.

There are a number of programs, government-sponsored and otherwise, that are designed to help aspiring homeowners find and get approved for a mortgage that works for them.

Among these are first-time homeowner loans insured by the Housing and Urban Development Department, mortgages and loans insured by the USDA designed to help people living in urban and rural areas, and VA loans, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.


In today’s post, I’m going to give you a basic rundown of VA loans, who is eligible for them, and how to apply for one. That way you’ll feel confident knowing you’re getting the best possible deal on your home mortgage.


What is a VA Loan?

VA loans can provide soon-to-be homeowners who have served their country with low-interest rates and no private mortgage insurance (PMI).

If you’re hoping to buy a home soon and don’t have at least a 20% down payment, you typically have to take out private mortgage insurance. This means paying an extra insurance bill on top of your monthly mortgage payments. The downside of PMI is that it never turns into equity that you can then use when you decide to move again or sell your home.

Loans that are guaranteed by the VA don’t require PMI because the bank knows your loan is a safer investment than if it wasn’t guaranteed

VA loans may also help you secure a lower interest rate, or give you some negotiating power when it comes to discussing your interest rate.

Finally, VA loans set limits on the number of closing costs you can pay in your mortgage. And, if you’ve ever bought a home before, you’ll know how quickly closing costs can add up.

Who is eligible?

There are some common misconceptions about who can apply for a VA loan? So, we’ll cover all the bases of eligibility.

If you meet one of the following criteria, you may be eligible for a VA loan:


  • You’ve served 90 consecutive days during wartime

  • You’ve served 181 days during peacetime

  • You’ve served six or more years in the Reserves or National Guard

  • Your spouse died due to their work in the military

There are some restrictions to these eligibilities. For example, your chosen lender may still have credit score minimums.

Applying for a VA Loan

There are two main steps for applying for a VA Loan. First, you’ll have to ensure your eligibility. You can do this by checking the VA’s official website. Be sure to call them with any questions you may have.

Next, you’ll need a certificate of eligibility. The easiest way to acquire one is through your chosen lender.  If you haven’t chosen a lender, you can also apply online through the eBenefits portal, or by mailing in a paper application.

Once you have a certificate, you can apply for your mortgage and you’ll be on your way to buying a home.




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